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Representative is registered with and offers only securities and advisory services through PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor and member FINRA/SIPC. 6187 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria CA. 93013, (800) 874-6910. Randall Wealth Management Group and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently owned and operated. Trevor R. Randall - CA Insurance License #0I08678

 

PlanMember is not responsible or liable for ancillary products or services offered by Randall Wealth Management Group. The views expressed may not necessarily reflect those held by PlanMember Securities Corporation (PSEC). Material presented is believed to be from a reliable sources and PSEC makes no representation as to it accuracy or completeness. 

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Get These Decisions Right


The sheer number of financial decisions required to manage our finances can seem overwhelming. But often we spend an inordinate amount of time on small stuff — getting the bills paid on time, reconciling bank accounts, and calling to have a late charge waived. While those things need to get done, how do we judge whether we’re headed on the right course? There are six basic financial decisions that can determine the course of your financial life:

1. How you earn a living. Sure, we all want to enjoy our work. But why not choose a job that will pay more than another? Your income is going to drive all your other decisions, so investigate your options:

  • Are you sure you’re being paid a competitive wage with competitive benefits? Pay attention to what is going on in your field.

  • Do you have an outside interest or hobby that can be turned into a paying job? This could be a good way to supplement your current salary.

  • Can you get some additional training to help secure a promotion or qualify for another job? Read up on what jobs are expected to experience the highest growth rates and/or highest salaries over the next five years.

2. How you spend your income. The amount of money left over for saving is a direct result of your lifestyle choices, so learn to live within your means. To get a grip on spending, consider these tips:

  • Analyze your spending for a month. In which categories do you spend more than you expected? Give serious thought to your purchasing patterns, trying to find ways to reduce spending.

  • One of the most significant spending decisions will be your home. Many people purchase the largest home they can afford, often straining their budget. Purchasing a smaller home will reduce your mortgage payment as well as other costs.

  • Prepare a budget to guide your spending. Few people enjoy setting or sticking to a budget, but inefficient and wasted expenditures can be major impediments to accomplishing your financial goals.

3. How much you save. You should be saving a minimum of 10% of your gross income. But don’t just rely on that rule of thumb. Calculate how much you'll need to meet your financial goals and how much you should be saving on an annual basis. If you can’t seem to save that much, go back to your spending analysis and cut spending.

4. How you invest. The ultimate size of your portfolio is a function of two factors — how much you save and how much you earn on those savings. Even small differences in return can significantly impact your investment portfolio. Typically, investments with potentially higher rates of return have more volatility than those with lower rates of return. While you don’t want to take on excessive risk, you also don’t want to leave all your savings in investments with little growth potential. Your portfolio should contain a diversified mix of investment categories based on your return expectations, risk tolerance, and time horizon for investing.

5. How you manage debt. Before you take on debt, consider the effect it will have on your long-term goals. If you are already having trouble finding money to save, additional debt will make it even more difficult to save. To keep your debt in check, consider these tips:

  • Mortgage debt is acceptable as long as you can easily afford the home.

  • Be careful about taking equity out of your home in the form of a home-equity loan. You might want to set up a home-equity line of credit for emergency use, but make sure it is only used for emergencies. It may also make sense to use a home-equity loan to pay off higher interest rate consumer loans, but don’t run those balances up again.

  • Never purchase items on credit that decrease in value, such as clothing, vacations, food, and entertainment. If you can’t pay cash, don’t buy them.

  • If you must incur debt, borrow wisely. Make as large a down payment as you can. Consider a shorter loan period, even though your payment will be higher. Since interest rates can vary widely, compare loan terms with several lenders. Review all your debt periodically to see if less-expensive options are available.

6. How you prepare for financial emergencies. Making arrangements to handle financial emergencies will help prevent them from adversely affecting your financial goals. Make sure to have:

  • An emergency fund covering several months of living expenses. Besides cash, that fund can include readily accessible investments or a line of credit.

  • Insurance to cover catastrophes. At a minimum, review your coverage for life, medical, homeowners, auto, disability, and personal liability.

  • A power of attorney so someone can step in and take over your finances if you become incapacitated.

Making the correct choices for these six basic financial decisions will help put you on the right financial course.

Representative is registered with and offers only securities and advisory services through PlanMember Securities Corporation, a registered broker/dealer, investment advisor and member FINRA/SIPC. 6187 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria CA. 93013, (800) 874­-6910. Randall Wealth Management Group and PlanMember Securities Corporation are independently owned and operated. PSEC is not responsible or liable for ancillary products or services offered by Randall Wealth Management Group or this representative. CA Insurance License: #0727953.

This newsletter was prepared by Integrated Concepts Group, Inc. The opinions expressed in this newsletter are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendations for any individual. It is suggested that you consult your financial professional, attorney, or tax advisor with regard to your individual situation. The views expressed are those of the author and may not necessarily reflect those held by PlanMember Securities Corporation. Material presented is believed to be from a reliable sources and PSEC makes no representation as to it accuracy or completeness.


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